Trying to Move the Needle: Expanding the DH Reviewer Pool

Today it was #Brexit. Two days ago it was #nobillnobreak. Two weeks ago it was #Orlando. Friends and colleagues in Texas are attending workshops on how to deal with campus carry. Friends and colleagues in the U.K. and Europe are wondering about ... everything. I don't mean to conflate the profound and disturbing events and trends that have led to fear and hatred and tragedy on so many levels. What can we do in the face of all of this, when doors are being slammed shut, and friends and colleagues are in real physical and personal and professional danger?

We can keep wedging open a door. Even a little bit. Continue reading Trying to Move the Needle: Expanding the DH Reviewer Pool

How we Teach? Digital Humanities Pedagogy in an Imperfect World

I was honoured to give this keynote at the CSDH/SCHN conference at Congress in Calgary on Wednesday.

I would like to start by thanking Susan Brown, Jon Bath, Michael Ullyot, and CSDH for inviting me to speak here. I’m sorry Susan isn’t here because I wanted her to hear this, too, so would someone tweet out to her that it is a particular honor for me to be here because #myDH (as the hashtag goes) is Canadian. Many of the people in this room have been directly responsible in ways they will never know for shaping my relationship to the Digital Humanities and my identity as a Digital Humanist - my training, my professionalization, my research and publication agenda. But more important, you have epitomized for me the possibilities for progressive, collaborative, thoughtful DH, and why that is crucial to the ways in which global DH should be conducted. You have also taught me that those possibilities come with responsibility, and that that responsibility cannot be taken lightly. And so I take this talk very seriously and personally. Continue reading How we Teach? Digital Humanities Pedagogy in an Imperfect World

REED and the Prospect of Networked Data at CSRS 2016

This is the transcript of a long paper I gave as part of the "Digital Scholarship in Action: Research" panel at CSRS (Canadian Society for Renaissance Studies) in Calgary on May 30, 2016. The attendant PowerPoint is stored and indexed on the MLA Commons Open Repository Exchange, and is available here: http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6CK59

"REED and the Prospect of Networked Data"

At the MLA in January I gave a short paper entitled “Data Envy” - a contemplation of my inferiority complex with regards to scholars who have massive corpora to work with - Moretti-sized data. I reflected on the fact that the type of research with which I’m usually involved relies on close reading of texts and maps - and at the very most I’ve been able to work with is 2,500 records. I’ll get back to that in a moment, but I’d just like to say that I ended that short talk with a provocation - one that I’d like to use as the jumping off point for this paper: in today’s DH environment, where big data and linked data are increasingly the focus of scholars looking for ways to extend their research questions through more expansive and complementary datasets, what is the role of the individual research project? Is its value now truly in its integration and association and aggregation with other datasets? Continue reading REED and the Prospect of Networked Data at CSRS 2016