And so it begins: working towards DH2017

On Thursday I sent an email to the combined Digital Humanities 2017 and Digital Humanities 2018 conference program committees welcoming and congratulating them on being part of the work we will take on over the coming 16 months (and in the process support the planning process for DH2018).

[for those of you who are friends not steeped in things DH, I'm talking about the DH2017 and DH2018 conferences that will take place in Montreal (2017) and Mexico City (2018] Continue reading And so it begins: working towards DH2017

“Data Envy” at MLA 2016

This is the transcript of the short paper I gave as part of the "Digital Scholarship in Action: Research" panel at MLA 2016 in January . The attendant PowerPoint is stored and indexed on the MLA Commons Open Repository Exchange, and is available here: https://commons.mla.org/deposits/item/mla:667/

"Data Envy: Or, maintaining one’s self-confidence as a digital humanist at a time when everyone seems to be talking about …  Big Data"

SELF-CONSCIOUS: Perhaps I’m being overly self-conscious, but lately I’ve felt increasingly out of the loop in terms of DH discourse - namely because I don’t do big data. Or at least I don’t think I do. And I observe that discussions about DH invariably involve topic modeling and pattern recognition and linked data and large-scale data visualization and “bags of words”.

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Introductory Markup Experiments

This week in my HUMN 100 course we began the TEI module, which will see students tagging individual anecdotes in "Tarlton's Jests" and compiling them into a digital edition. We've been wrestling with some computer problems this term that have made the round-table collaborative nature of last fall's course a bit harder to sustain. Several students have had to work on the lab PCs around the edge of the room, which means their backs are to me, and they're not connecting with one another, either.

Continue reading Introductory Markup Experiments