“Data Envy” at MLA 2016

This is the transcript of the short paper I gave as part of the "Digital Scholarship in Action: Research" panel at MLA 2016 in January . The attendant PowerPoint is stored and indexed on the MLA Commons Open Repository Exchange, and is available here: https://commons.mla.org/deposits/item/mla:667/

"Data Envy: Or, maintaining one’s self-confidence as a digital humanist at a time when everyone seems to be talking about …  Big Data"

SELF-CONSCIOUS: Perhaps I’m being overly self-conscious, but lately I’ve felt increasingly out of the loop in terms of DH discourse - namely because I don’t do big data. Or at least I don’t think I do. And I observe that discussions about DH invariably involve topic modeling and pattern recognition and linked data and large-scale data visualization and “bags of words”.

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Linn: the Next Generation

It's been a while since I've written anything - mainly for lack of time and other writing deadlines, but also because I've been unsure what to write about in this space. I was hesitant to write about the course I taught in the fall while I was teaching it, and I've been cautious about writing anything professionally-oriented: so many people are writing (oftentimes articulately and also at times in incendiary tones) about alt-ac and DH and the state of higher education and the lack of jobs and and and ... I just don't feel like getting into a social media exchange about it. So I've just done a lot of sharing of other peoples' FB posts and tweets.
But now spring is (supposedly) coming, and I'm starting to think about co-presenting on the first iteration of Humanities 100 with Katie Faull this summer at ACH and DH, and thought it might be a good time to write about teaching and learning again.
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Digital Learning in an Undergraduate Context:

... promoting long term student-faculty (and community) collaboration in the Susquehanna Valley

This is the transcript of the paper that Katie Faull and I presented on July 9, 2014 at DH2014 in Lausanne, Switzerland. We are currently expanding this paper into an article for publication. The PowerPoint slides that accompanied our presentation are included at the end of this post.

INTRODUCTION
At several sessions and discussions at the 2014 Digital Humanities Summer Institute we noticed a marked increase in discussions focusing on teaching Digital Humanities; namely, how do we effectively port the tools and methodologies with which we work as researchers into the undergraduate classroom. Simultaneously, the question gradually shifted from “DO we teach Digital Humanities to undergraduates?” to “HOW do we teach Digital Humanities to undergraduates?”

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